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NATO Air Policing operations

U.S. Air Force News

  • AF Week in Photos

    This week's photos feature Airmen from around the globe involved in activities supporting expeditionary operations and defending America. This weekly feature showcases the men and women of the Air Force.

  • Women Airforce Service Pilots and their fight for veteran status

    As we celebrate Veterans Day, let’s take a moment to remember the remarkable history of the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots as their story reminds us how imperative it is to remember the debts we owe to previous generations who safeguarded our democracy.

  • Alaska Air Guardsmen build homes for Cherokee veterans

    Thirty-eight Airmen with the Alaska Air National Guard's 176th Wing helped build homes for Cherokee veterans in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, May 15-29, as part of the Defense Department’s Innovative Readiness Training program.

  • EOD tech draws inspiration from family members

    While many would consider the lifestyle of an EOD Airman a stressful and arduous task to undertake, to Tech. Sgt. Jaqueline Risley, 386th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron EOD equipment non-commissioned officer in charge, this is everything she has ever dreamed of.

  • Air Force Widow vows to bring awareness to invisible wounds

    Air Force veteran Stacey Pavenski, 46, of Palm Bay, Florida, has post traumatic stress disorder, but she didn’t get it from serving in combat. It came from her husband’s combat struggles that drove him to take his own life in their bedroom, Sept. 18, 2017, while she was in the kitchen. He was 45.

  • Living with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder; a veteran's story (Part 1)

    Post-traumatic stress disorder carries him into the depths of fear and pain; reliving images of death and destruction. Closing his eyes to night terrors at sundown and fighting through daily anxiety attacks eventually pushed him to the brink of suicide so he could put an end to the never-ending

  • Col. George Day advanced to the rank of brigadier general

    Medal of Honor recipient Col. George “Bud” Day was posthumously advanced to the rank of brigadier general during a Heritage to Horizons summer concert series at the Air Force Memorial in Arlington, Virginia, June 8, 2018.

  • Service Dog lends war veteran a helping paw

    While searching online for answers or others who might be going through the same problems, Jones found the link to a website for service dogs. He reached out to Carol Borden, founder and executive director of Guardian Angels Medical Service Dogs in Williston, Florida, hoping he could find the answer

  • Native warrior culture

    November has been designated as National American Indian Heritage Month since 1990. This is a time to celebrate the cultures, traditions, histories, and acknowledge the contributions of Native Americans.

  • Competition fuels hearts, ignites relationship

    In 2015, when a Naperville, Illinois girl met a small-town boy from Eagle River, Alaska, neither knew immediately how their relationship would evolve beyond teammates; however, the now engaged pair of retired Air Force athletes would still say “teammates” will always be a word that first comes to

  • 2017 Invictus Games slated to commence Sept. 23

    Athletes from around the world will come together in Toronto, to compete in the 2017 Invictus Games, uniting more than 550 wounded, ill or injured military service members from 17 nations to compete in 12 unique sporting events.

  • 182nd CES finishes construction rotation at Crow Reservation

    Thirty-five Airmen with the Illinois Air National Guard's 182nd Civil Engineer Squadron completed their two-week annual training constructing homes for Crow Tribe veterans Aug. 6, 2017 in Crow Agency, Montana.The Peoria-based squadron provided services including drywall, windows, doors, siding,

  • Bataan Death March: Airman honors POW grandfather

    Starvation, torture and a 70-mile march to concentration camps or dying in the process were the only options Philippine soldier, the late Ricardo Plana, faced after the U.S. surrendered the Bataan Peninsula to the Japanese during World War II. Now, 75 years later, his grandson, Staff Sgt. Max Biser,

  • Pioneer of tactical airlift visits MacDill AFB

    He began his visit with a speech at U.S. Special Operations Command.“I was a part of the 492nd Bombardment Group, also known as the ‘Carpetbaggers,’ during World War II,” Cole said. “We started as an anti-submarine squadron, but instead began working with the Office of Special Services to drop

  • Korean War veteran honored by nephew

    Maj. Gen. Scott Vander Hamm, the Air Force assistant deputy chief of staff of operations, presented retired Chief Master Sgt. Russell Rhodes with the Korean Ambassador for Peace Medal during a ceremony at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, Nov. 15. The medal is given as an expression of thanks from the

  • AF unveils latest ‘Veterans in Blue’ exhibit

    The seventh volume of “Veterans in Blue” is now available online. The exhibit captures 28 stories of heroism and service by Air Force veterans. Each veteran’s portrait is also displayed at the Pentagon.

  • Caribou Vietnam vets honored at Pentagon

    The assistant vice chief of staff of the Air Force unveiled a scale model C-7A Caribou during a ceremony acknowledging the service of Vietnam War Caribou crewmembers and support personnel at the Pentagon Sept. 9.

  • WWII veteran retires after 70 years of military, civil service

    This September, Anthony “Tony” Duno will celebrate his retirement from the Air Force after 70 years of service, making him the longest serving civilian in Air Force history. Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James recognized Duno’s accomplishments during a ceremony at the Pentagon in

  • Around the Air Force: July 6

    In this look around the Air Force, an F-35A Lightning II makes a trans-Atlantic flight, an Airman runs 694 miles for post-traumatic stress disorder awareness, and the Minnesota Air National Guard deploys to South Korea.

  • Air Force trailblazer returns to Ramstein after 54 years

    It doesn’t happen often but occasionally Airmen get the opportunity to meet an Airman who, in 1947, was there when the Air Force first stood on its own -- those trailblazers who laid the first bricks of airpower on the long blue line.

  • First lady to women veterans: ‘Tell your story’

    First lady Michelle Obama had a message for women veterans March 2: “Tell your story.” The first lady and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of vice president Joe Biden, attended an annual Women’s History Month reception, honoring women veterans and hosted by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi at the Capitol’s

  • B-52 veteran recalls close call on Desert Storm mission

    “Pilot, we have a lock-on,” the B-52 Stratofortress electronic warfare officer called out in surprise. Capt. Jim Bowles, a B-52 instructor pilot, gritted his teeth, looked downward and sure enough, an SA-6 surface-to-air missile had been launched in his direction.

  • Airmen honor WWII veteran's last wish

    Roy Mullinax enlisted in the Air Force shortly after the end of World War II, and his years of military service led to his recognition with a veteran’s pin through his hospice center in Newton, Kansas, by the 22nd Air Refueling Wing Honor Guard.

  • AF veteran survivor of three wars, plane crash

    Retired Lt. Col. Alma Skousen, a humble, soft-spoken 89-year-old fighter pilot, served his country during three wars, encountered Soviet MiG fighters in battle and survived a jet crash before ending his flying career as the 311th Tactical Fighter Training Squadron, now known as the 311th Fighter

  • Greatest generation honored during wreath laying, AF band concert

    As the sun began to set over the National Capitol Region, several hundred people gathered at the Air Force Memorial with the District of Columbia-city landscape as the backdrop to witness a wreath-laying event, followed by a concert performed by the United States Air Force Band Aug. 14.

  • Through the glass: Vet looks back

    The heritage center at Travis Air Force Base has many pieces of military, history rich with old war stories. One piece, a bullet-riddled B-24 Liberator windshield, tells the story of a man from a small town who went on to fight in World War II and gave more than 40 years of service to his country.

  • Flag creates deep bond between grandfather and grandson

    The U.S. military has a rich history, beginning with the Continental Army and extending to present day operations around the world, but for Senior Airman Steven Adkins, his own military history can be found in his backpack.

  • WWII veteran reunites with former aircraft

    World War II veteran, retired Lt. Col. Alston "Al" Daniels, reunited with the aircraft he piloted for nearly 2,000 hours on April 7. Daniels gleefully walked up the steps to a Douglas C-47D Skytrain cockpit for the first time since 1962.

  • AF introduces Volume 9 of Portraits in Courage

    The Air Force released its ninth volume of Portraits in Courage, highlighting five teams and seven individual Airman for their honor, valor, devotion and selfless sacrifice in the face of extreme danger to themselves and others.

  • Born to wave the flag

    Blaine Yelton was born Aug. 12, 1915, when World War I was in its second bloody year.

  • President pledges support to veterans

    The administration is moving ahead with changes to the VA. Obama signed the Veterans Access Choice and Accountability Act, which provides money to hire staff and allows veterans who live more than 40 miles from VA care to see doctors outside the VA.

  • Disability claims backlog reduced by 44 percent

    One year after the backlog of pending disability compensation claims peaked at over 611,000 in March 2013, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has reduced that number by approximately 44 percent to 344,000 claims -- a reduction of more than 267,000. At the same time officials have improved the