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Caregivers Caregivers play critical role in lives of wounded warriors
Tech. Sgt. Eric Fisher was two months into a five-month deployment in 2011 to Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan, when he suffered a heart attack after an intense rocket attack, and a day of moving heavy pallets on the flight line.
0 9/13
2017
Staff Sgt. David Olson, an explosive ordnance disposal troop from Abilene, Texas, competes in the seated shot put at the 2017 Department of Defense Warrior Games July 5, 2017, at Soldier Field, Chicago, Ill. A brush with suicide occurred near the beginning of 2017, and Olson recounted his personal struggle with suicidal ideations along with the toll his physical and invisible wounds have taken not just on his life, but on those of his loved ones. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexx Pons) Adaptive sports shift outlook on life
“I was sitting at home alone one night and had taken out my pistol; I remember how cool it felt in my hands and knowing I was moments away from taking my life. In that split second, my phone went off with a text from one of my Airmen who said he needed my help getting to work the next morning, and I remember putting down my weapon to be there for him. That next morning, I planned on picking up where I had left off, but received an email from the Air Force Wounded Warrior saying I had been accepted into their program… that text and that email saved my life.”
0 7/07
2017
Tech. Sgt. Christopher D’Angelo, right, a 490th Missile Squadron missile alert facility manager at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., poses for a photo with his wife, Chanda, son, Jace and daughter, Brittyn at their home in Great Falls, Mont., June 7, 2017. D’Angelo was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder after he was injured by an improvised explosive device Jan. 15, 2008. He said his wife has been very supportive with helping him cope with his PTSD. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Chad Thompson) Healing from invisible wounds: The other side of the story
Chanda D’Angelo was in a frenzy; she quickly washed all the clothes in her home, zoomed the vacuum across every floor, wiped down every surface, cleaned out the refrigerator and stove and scrubbed the windows and mirrors until they were spotless. Exhausted, she had just enough time to get her hair and nails done – everything had to be perfect for her husband’s return.
0 6/28
2017
Default Air Force Logo PTSD treatment confronts the trauma behind the disorder
Post-traumatic stress disorder is considered one of the “signature wounds” of the current conflicts in the Middle East. But many people may not know that there are highly effective treatments for this invisible wound being deployed at Air Force hospitals and clinics today.
0 6/22
2017
Senior Airman Christopher D’Angelo, a heavy equipment operator, has worked to recover from post-traumatic stress disorder with the help of his family. Healing from invisible wounds
On Jan. 15, 2008, Senior Airman Christopher D’Angelo, a heavy equipment operator, was the lead gunner in an armored vehicle convoy on a road near Baghdad. The sun was shining and the air comfortable. His unit had just transported construction materials to forward operating bases and was currently scouting an area to see how they might transport heavy equipment.
0 6/13
2017
May is mental health month, and mental health disorders are common in both military and civilian communities. Fortunately, effective treatments exist for most mental health disorders. Often, the biggest impediment to getting better is an unwillingness to seek care. Don’t suffer alone – mental health disorders have effective treatments
Mental health disorders are relatively common within civilian and military communities, but with early treatment, most mental health disorders can be effectively treated, and patients can return to mental wellness.
0 5/14
2017
Tech. Sgt. Terrance Williams, the 22nd Security Forces Squadron resources NCO in charge, poses for a photo March 28, 2017, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. Since he began his recovery from depression, anxiety, alcoholism, post-traumatic stress disorder and a suicide attempt, Williams wants to help other people who are facing similar obstacles. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Erin McClellan) A journey of resiliency: Healing the wounds that can’t be seen
Nine deployments, severe depression, anxiety and alcoholism, post-traumatic stress disorder and a suicide attempt were what drove one McConnell Airman to begin a journey to reshape his life.
0 3/30
2017
Default Air Force Logo New program to help ISR aircrews cope with different kind of PTSD
Finding targets by watching and listening is, by nature, intensely personal and can have a long-lasting effect, to include post-traumatic stress disorder, on intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance Airmen involved. The 361st ISR Group is developing a ‘Re-Fit’ program which will assist Airmen in overcoming existing mental health disorders and prevent future problems.
0 11/29
2016
Default Air Force Logo Around the Air Force: July 6
In this look around the Air Force, an F-35A Lightning II makes a trans-Atlantic flight, an Airman runs 694 miles for post-traumatic stress disorder awareness, and the Minnesota Air National Guard deploys to South Korea.
0 7/06
2016
If you, or someone you know, have been through a traumatic event, seek out a mental health provider and request a screening. PTSD does not usually go away on its own and the earlier you seek help the sooner  you can start feeling better and return to the life you want to lead.  (AF Graphic)
PTSD awareness leads to positive treatment
Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating in some patients, but thanks to advancements in research and the continued training of mental health providers, treatments are getting better all the time. Maj. Joel Foster, the chief of Air Force Deployment Mental Health, said treating PTSD has improved dramatically in the last 20 years.
0 6/27
2016
Default Air Force Logo BLUE: Charlie Mike to Recovery
Through the fog of post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic injuries, and illness, American veterans realize that the ability to regain control of their minds and bodies lies within their own hands.
0 6/15
2016
Default Air Force Logo AF program increases access to behavioral health care
Nearly half of people with a treatable behavioral health disorder do not seek help from behavioral health professionals, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. However, 80 percent of this population does visit a primary care manager at least once a year. An Air Force program seeks to bridge this gap by providing behavioral health care in a primary care setting.
0 6/07
2016
Lack of sleep can be attributed to post-traumatic stress disorder, stress anxiety or depression among several other mental ailments. Individuals experiencing insomnia or other sleep issues should contact their medical provider as soon as possible. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Micaiah Anthony) Mental maintenance: Tools to keep the mind fit
Airmen often go to the fitness center; some spend several hours a week toning their bodies, while others go to simply maintain their physique. But what about strengthening the mind?
0 3/29
2016
Former Staff Sgt. Gregory Miller, right, talks about one of his mixed media pieces during a healing arts event Nov. 12 at the Pentagon. Miller and other wounded military members were recognized for their work as part of a healing arts program created by the Defense Department and the National Endowment for the Arts to offer art therapy to recovering troops. (U.S. Air Force photo/Sean Kimmons) Art therapy helps close the wounds of Air Force vets
As a mortuary affairs Airman, retired Master Sgt. Justin Jordan handled dozens of bodies of service members, many of whom were killed downrange. But one mission at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, finally made him crack.
0 11/13
2015
Default Air Force Logo BLUE: Charlie Mike to recovery
In this episode of BLUE, through the fog of post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic injury and illness, American veterans realize that the ability to regain control of their minds and bodies lies within themselves. Wounded warriors talk about how the Air Force Wounded Warrior Care Program has helped them on the road to recovery.
1 6/19
2015
Moe, an Air Force service dog, watches retired Master Sgt. Kyle Burnett as she competes in the 2014 Warrior Games archery competition Oct. 1, 2014, at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo. Thirty-nine athletes contended in the recurve and compound bow categories, all aiming for a spot on the medals podium.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jette Carr) No greater friend
Service dogs can range from being a person's eyes, sensing a seizure or low blood sugar, to sniffing out improvised explosive devices on the battlefield. For some of the Air Force's wounded warrior athletes, service dogs provide so much more than just physical assistance.
0 10/03
2014
Capt.  Mitch Kieffer and his family enjoy a moment together after his big finish in the Warrior Games cycling competition Sept. 29, 2014, at Fort Carson, Colorado.  Despite the downpour of rain, his wife and two daughters stayed by the course to watch as Kieffer competed and placed second in his cycling category. Kieffer is an operations research analyst at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jette Carr)   A love story: healing the wounded warrior
He was a young Air Force officer healing from a recent trauma and she was a dedicated single mother of two. Whether it was friends or fate that first brought them together, neither would have suspected that their chance meeting in Florida would be the key to his recovery. Their introduction to each other was unlikely – not due to the events of the day they met, but of one roughly six months earlier, when Capt. Mitch Kieffer lay in a hospital bed in Iraq about to be medically evacuated to the states...
0 9/29
2014
Default Air Force Logo Dogs help vets cope with PTSD, trauma
Though she was home, Capt. Mary McGriff felt no comfort. She was alone but anxious, quiet but uneasy. She felt no safety behind locked doors. The doctor's words rang fresh in her mind, behind splintered memories of her 2005 deployment to Iraq.
1 3/07
2014
Default Air Force Logo DOD officials order disability board results review
Some Airmen who met a medical or physical disability evaluation board between Sept. 11, 2001 and April 30, 2012 prior to separating from the Air Force may be eligible for re-evaluation, Air Force Personnel Center officials said.
5 12/09
2013
After a traumatic car accident, Tech Sgt. Ashley Barnett, 1st Operations Support Squadron weather mission services NCO in charge, suffered from chronic back pain which led to depression. After recovering, Barnett said she felt it was important to share her experiences and let fellow Service members know there are resources available to aid the recovery process. Airman reflects on recovery, resiliency
While driving southbound on I-95 in Virginia in June 2011, an 18-wheeler struck the car behind the then-staff sergeant, creating a chain reaction. The collision resulted in a four-car accident, blowing out all four windows and totaling Barnett's car, leaving her injured.
0 9/19
2013
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