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T-1A Jayhawk

A T-1A Jayhawk on a training mission near Randolph Air Force Base, Texas (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt. Col. Russell Hopkinson)

A T-1A Jayhawk on a training mission near Randolph Air Force Base, Texas (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt. Col. Russell Hopkinson)

A T-1A Jayhawk flies over downtown San Antonio. The aircraft is assigned to the 99th Flying Training Squadron at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt. Col. Russell Hopkinson)

A T-1A Jayhawk flies over downtown San Antonio. The aircraft is assigned to the 99th Flying Training Squadron at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt. Col. Russell Hopkinson)

FILE PHOTO -- The T-1A Jayhawk is a medium-range, twin-engine jet trainer. It is used by the U. S. Air Force's Air Education and Training Command to train student pilots to fly airlift or tanker aircraft. The swept wing T-1A is a version of the Beech 400A. It has cockpit seating for an instructor and two students and is powered by twin turbofan engines capable of an operating speed of Mach .78. The T-1A differs from its commercial counterpart with a single-point refueling system with greater capacity and increased bird strike protection in the windshield and leading edges for sustained low-level operation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Fernando Serna)

FILE PHOTO -- The T-1A Jayhawk is a medium-range, twin-engine jet trainer. It is used by the U. S. Air Force's Air Education and Training Command to train student pilots to fly airlift or tanker aircraft. The swept wing T-1A is a version of the Beech 400A. It has cockpit seating for an instructor and two students and is powered by twin turbofan engines capable of an operating speed of Mach .78. The T-1A differs from its commercial counterpart with a single-point refueling system with greater capacity and increased bird strike protection in the windshield and leading edges for sustained low-level operation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Fernando Serna)

The underside view of a T-1A Jayhawk on a training mission over San Antonio recently (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt. Col. Russell Hopkinson)

The underside view of a T-1A Jayhawk on a training mission over San Antonio recently (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt. Col. Russell Hopkinson)

VANCE AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. -- An air-to-air view of a T-1 Jayhawk during a training mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Terry Wasson)

VANCE AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. -- An air-to-air view of a T-1 Jayhawk during a training mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Terry Wasson)

Mission
The T-1A Jayhawk is a medium-range, twin-engine jet trainer used in the advanced phase of specialized undergraduate pilot training for students selected to fly airlift or tanker aircraft. It is also used to support navigator training for the U.S. Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and international services.

Features
The swept-wing T-1A is a military version of the Beech 400A. It has cockpit seating for an instructor and two students and is powered by twin turbofan engines capable of an operating speed of 538 mph.  The T-1A differs from its commercial counterpart with structural enhancements that provide for increased bird strike resistance and an additional fuselage fuel tank.

Background
The first T-1A was delivered to Reese Air Force Base, Texas, in January 1992, and student training began in 1993.

Starting in 1993, undergraduate pilots who have graduated from their primary aircraft have proceeded to specialized training tailored for their follow-on assignments. The T-1A is used in advanced training for students identified to go into airlift or tanker aircraft. Those selected for bombers and fighters receive their advanced in the T-38.

The T-1A is used at Columbus AFB, Miss., Laughlin AFB, Texas, and Vance AFB, Okla. It is also used at Randolph AFB, Texas, to train instructor pilots and at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., for combat systems officer training.

General Characteristics
Primary Function: Advanced trainer for airlift and tanker pilots
Builder: Raytheon Corp. (Beech)
Power Plant: Two Pratt and Whitney JT15D-5B turbofan engines
Thrust: 2,900 pounds each engine
Length: 48 feet, 5 inches (14.75 meters)
Height: 13 feet, 11 inches (4.24 meters)
Wingspan: 43 feet, 6 inches (13.25 meters)
Maximum Speed: 538 miles per hour (Mach .70)
Ceiling: 41,000 feet (12,500 meters)
Maximum Takeoff Weight: 16,100 pounds (7,303 kilograms)
Range: 2,222 nautical miles (2,900 nm flying long-range cruise)
Armament: None
Crew: Three (pilot, co-pilot, instructor pilot)
Date Deployed: February 1992
Unit Cost: $4.1 million
Inventory: Active force, 178; ANG, 0; Reserve, 0

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