Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians

Commentaries

  • Instructor pilot offers personal look in how CFC helps

    The Combined Federal Campaign is something I look forward to each year. It is important to me because it easily permits me to support organizations that raise awareness, funds research, and assists those afflicted by a rare genetic disorder that runs in my family.

  • Leading the way: A spark to start a fire

    As a leader, do not let your ego get in the way. Stand tall, but not above everyone else. Do not tell people what to do, show them. Showing them is what leading is all about. When you show them, you are creating that spark.

  • AF vet uses marathon training to cope with PTSD

    As a disabled Air Force veteran living with post-traumatic stress from military sexual trauma, I’ve had my good days and bad days but all of my hard work over the past two years paid off Oct. 25 when I achieved one of my goals -- completing my first full marathon, the Marine Corps Marathon.

  • Feedback is essential to AF integrity

    It is not necessarily easy to provide honest feedback. Obvious deficiencies can be easy to identify and communicate, but it can be difficult to come up with areas of improvement for your unit's outstanding performers. However, it can and must be done, as everyone has room for improvement.

  • The in-house recruiter

    As difficult as it may be to supervise our Airmen, we must always strive to endear them while we endure them because, after all, we were once them.

  • Balance

    Whether we're talking about our life, family, or career, it boils down to balance. Having a healthy balance is the only way that we can sustain effectiveness. I can recall times as a young officer when working 14 hours a day was common. There are times when the mission will drive us to work extended

  • Innovation: Never stop improving

    Maintaining the best Air Force on the planet, through these challenges, isn't solely the job of our leaders, nor is it a one-time thing. We must continually innovate.

  • ALS: Rediscovering the profession of arms

    When thinking about Airman leadership school, what thoughts come to mind? Many Airmen may think of professional military education as boring, a box to check or a waste of time. For me, ALS was none of these things.

  • Follow up: It can be a matter of life, death

    Really taking care of Airmen means more than passing them off to a helping agency, assuming they're good to go, and then moving on. It means following up over the long term and not allowing ourselves to believe that anyone is immune from needing a helping hand, and more than just once. It may be

  • Separated but not alone

    Growing up as a military child myself, I knew separation could be extremely hard and hit at any time. Looking back, I now know how alone my mother felt whenever my father went on deployments or TDY. It seems like an eternity waiting for your loved one to return home so you aren't carrying all the