Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians

Commentaries

  • Every Airman has a role in preventing sexual assault

    Sexual assault is a crime and impacts the very trust and respect that is integral to our profession. For our Air Force to be successful, we must trust each other. All it takes is one incident of assault to break that bond of trust, but it takes all of us to work together to solve the issue.

  • Finding light through darkness

    That secret is one that took me nearly a year to even reveal to my mother and I have yet to reveal to the majority of my family or friends. The Airmen I serve alongside everyday have no idea that I'm a victim of sexual assault, until now.

  • Goals: How many of us have them?

    Have you set goals for your future? According to dictionary.com, "a goal is the result or achievement toward which effort is directed." Goals can be short or long-term, personal, professional, spiritual or physical, and are usually specific to a person or group. According to Dr. Gail Matthews, a

  • Providing eyes for another

    2nd Lt. Samantha Morrison has competed in hundreds of races before, but never has she competed in one quite like this.

  • Celebrating Academy's 60th anniversary: 'We've come a long way'

    As we celebrate the Air Force Academy's 60th anniversary, I salute all of the proud servicemen and women who have devoted themselves to producing leaders of character for our Air Force and our nation. As the United States' youngest service academy, our Air Force's Academy continues a proud heritage

  • I will no longer be a victim

    As a young child the horrors of sexual violence arrested my sense of safety, security and the sanctity of my home -- robbing me of self-worth, my voice and the development of healthy boundaries.

  • Leadership Lessons: Protecting the Castle

    In my position as the command chief, I always take advantage of the many opportunities to speak with Airmen. I often ask them several canned questions just to get the conversation rolling. "Where are you from?", "Why did you join the Air Force?", "Have you called your mom and dad lately?"

  • 100 pounds later: The new me

    I never used to push myself physically. Even as a high school athlete, I didn’t feel the drive to push harder. I spent my first 10 years in the Air Force getting by just fine as a smoker, who barely exercised. I steadily gained 10 pounds per year during the first four years.