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The gift of a kidney bolsters bond between classmates Organ donation bolsters bond between classmates
Col. Dave Ashley’s schedule since May 2017 included climbing a mountain, completing a 40-mile trail run, competing in a multiday athletic event that included bicycling and kayaking and achieving a perfect score on his military physical fitness test, his seventh in a row. Ashley accomplished all of these feats after donating a kidney. What began as an impulse to help a desperately ill former classmate has turned into a campaign to make sure other service members know the Military Health System supports those who want to become living organ donors.
0 11/07
2017
Default Air Force Logo Annual consent for automatic prescription refills begins Sept. 1
Beginning Sept. 1, 2017, Express Scripts will need annual consent from patients who want to receive automatic refills of their maintenance medications enrolled in TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery. This means that just before one of your prescriptions runs out of refills, Express Scripts will reach out to you to know if you would like your doctor to be contacted to renew the prescription and if you’d like to continue in the Automatic Refill program. If not, Express Scripts will not refill your prescription.
0 8/17
2017
AFMS MTFs Pilot Medical Readiness Air Force Military Treatment Facilities pilot medical readiness
Air Force Medicine has a non-stop global readiness mission. Medical Airmen must be prepared to deploy on short notice to provide life-saving and performance-enhancing healthcare in diverse, austere and isolated locations, and all Airmen must be medically ready to deploy. To achieve this readiness mission, the Air Force Medical Service operates 76 military treatment facilities around the world, which serve as the primary readiness and training vehicles.
0 8/12
2017
The Air Force Medical Service is launching a mobile app that will let users access the news and information available on the AFMS website right from their smartphones. New Air Force health mobile app available for patients
The Air Force Medical Service has launched a new mobile app to connect Airmen and patients to news and information about the AFMS. The new app is a mobile version of the AFMS website, and lets users customize their experience based on the Air Force military treatment facility they use. This way, patients can get information about clinic hours, find phone numbers and get other valuable information about the MTF where they work or get care.
0 7/07
2017
Default Air Force Logo PTSD treatment confronts the trauma behind the disorder
Post-traumatic stress disorder is considered one of the “signature wounds” of the current conflicts in the Middle East. But many people may not know that there are highly effective treatments for this invisible wound being deployed at Air Force hospitals and clinics today.
0 6/22
2017
Chief Master Sergeant David J. Little, Chief, Medical Operations and Research, Office of the Air Force Surgeon General, speaks during the Feb. 2017 Medical Museum Science Café at the National Museum of Health and Medicine, on Tues., Feb. 28, 2017. Little's program was titled "Air Force Medical Service: Building Competent, Capable Enlisted Airmen." Air Force Medicine: Anytime, anywhere in the world
SILVER SPRING, MD. (AFNS) -- The U.S. Air Force Medical Service assures that the service deploys a medically-fit force and educates airmen to become medical professionals, according to Chief Master Sgt. David J. Little, the Office of the Air Force Surgeon General Chief of medical operations and research.
0 6/22
2017
Default Air Force Logo Connection saves lives: Be there to help prevent suicide
You can make a difference for someone struggling with suicidal thoughts with as little as eye contact and a friendly smile, an arm around the shoulder, or a kind word at the right time.
0 6/21
2017
May is mental health month, and mental health disorders are common in both military and civilian communities. Fortunately, effective treatments exist for most mental health disorders. Often, the biggest impediment to getting better is an unwillingness to seek care. Don’t suffer alone – mental health disorders have effective treatments
Mental health disorders are relatively common within civilian and military communities, but with early treatment, most mental health disorders can be effectively treated, and patients can return to mental wellness.
0 5/14
2017
Lt. Col. (Dr.) Matthew Hann, 81st Medical Operations Squadron interventional cardiologist, inserts a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System at the Keesler Medical Center April 13, 2017, on Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing System is a new type of heart device that provides patients with the most advanced pacing technology at one-tenth the size of a traditional pacemaker. Keesler is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue) KMC medics implant AF’s 1st Micra TPS
The Keesler Medical Center became the first Air Force hospital to implant the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia April 13, 2017.
0 4/19
2017
An Air Force-invented cooling sleeve for a water bladder and cooling inserts for a specially-designed undershirt are two ways that Dr. Reginald O'Hara and his research team at the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine hope to help Battlefield Airmen and other special operations forces avoid heat-related illness while in hot, humid conditions. (Courtesy photo) Battlefield Airmen use science to beat the heat
Heat-related illness is a critical factor when personnel are operating in extreme temperatures. Dr. Reginald O'Hara and his exercise physiology research team at the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, are working to reduce that heat stress.
0 7/08
2016
Default Air Force Logo Changing Air Force health care through innovation
Air Force Medical Service Innovations and Personalized Medicine program personnel are conducting innovative research to find new solutions to improve healthcare throughout the Air Force.
0 6/30
2016
Default Air Force Logo AF continues to monitor Zika, infected mosquitoes could hit US this summer
As the threat of infected mosquitoes reaching the U.S. climbs, the Air Force continues to closely monitor the emergence of Zika virus infections to help inform and protect Airmen and their families.
0 6/04
2016
BALAD AIR BASE, Iraq -- Maj. Michael Matchette, 332nd Expeditionary Medical Support Squadron radiologist, reviews CT scans from a trauma patient to determine the severity of the injuries at the Air Force Theater Hospital here, Feb. 20. The CT scan process goes directly from the scanning machine to the computer, which allows doctors to diagnose medical problems faster. Major Matchette is deployed from Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo by/ Senior Airman Julianne Showalter) Military brain injury expert: Everyone’s ability to recover is different
Every brain is different. We know this because each person’s brain develops with a unique personality. But the brain as an organ even differs from person to person, and reacts uniquely to injury.
0 3/22
2016
This diagram illustrates the influence of light and darkness on the circadian rhythm and related physiology and behavior through the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the brain. (Graphic courtesy of Steve Thompson, AFMS Public Affairs) Sleep is serious: Catch your Zzzs
“Beep. Beep. Beep,” the alarm blares. Time to get up. Do you hit snooze? On average, we spend 33 percent of our lives asleep. When assessing your overall health, have you considered your sleep habits?
8 3/10
2016
JOINT BASE BALAD, Iraq – Members of the 332nd Expeditionary Medical Group unload a patient from an Iraqi helicopter during medical evacuation training for the Iraqi Air Force Dec. 21, 2009. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Brittany Y. Bateman) Air Force continues to improve care in the air
The Air Mobility Command Surgeon General’s office and researchers across the Air Force, to include the 711th Human Resource Wing at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, have been working together to improve how the Air Force provides care in the air. The AMC/SG is responsible for clinical oversight of the Air Force aeromedical evacuation (AE) system.
0 2/16
2016
Tech. Sgt. Theresa Hillis, front, of the 68th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron (AES), Norton Air Force Base, Calif.; Senior Master Sgt. James Cundall, right, of the 118th AES, Tennessee Air National Guard, Nashville, Tenn.; and Tech. Sgt. Dennis Mulline, left, of the 137th AES receive a mission briefing during Operation Desert Storm. Gulf War created need for better critical care
January 2016 marks the 25th anniversary of Desert Storm, and also a turning point in Air Force Medical Service’s Critical Care Transport Teams.
0 1/14
2016
Default Air Force Logo Air Force Medical Service’s Year in Review
In 2015, the doctors, nurses and technicians of the Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) made a difference in the Air Force’s mission, while new AFMS technologies and training exercises ensured air and space superiority.
0 12/29
2015
An emergency room nurse and a medical technician from Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., work in the University Medical Center of Southern Nevada’s emergency department during their training with the Sustained Medical and Readiness Trained (SMART) program. (U.S. Air Force photo)
SMART program keeps medics ready for any contingency
Military medical professionals have to always be ready for war and for whatever contingency the future brings. They need to either improve or remain current in medical skills necessary for any future battlefield, with its host of wounds and injuries, and for humanitarian assistance or disaster relief missions.
0 12/16
2015
Default Air Force Logo Air Force revamping flight, operational medicine
The Air Force Medical Service is restructuring flight and operational medicine by separating primary care and occupational medicine services into two distinct clinics, with the goal of improving care and creating more efficient and patient-centered workflows.
0 11/25
2015
Default Air Force Logo Airmen can access behavioral health services in primary care clinics
Airmen, veterans and family members seeking care for a variety of mental health and medical conditions have direct access to care from their primary care clinic.
0 5/12
2015
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