HomeNewsArticle Display

AFRL licenses second technology to local firm

AFRL Materials and Manufacturing Assistant Chief Engineer, Dr. Larry Brott, displays infrared powder used to form pellets in the creation of infrared technologies for battlefield communication and training. (U.S. Air Force photo/Donna Lindner)

Dr. Larry Brott, Air Force Research Laboratory Materials and Manufacturing Assistant chief engineer, displays infrared powder used to form pellets in the creation of infrared technologies for battlefield communication and training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Donna Lindner)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio (AFNS) --

A year ago, Dr. Larry Brott of the Air Force Research Laboratory, along with his co-inventors, licensed a technology for a pressure-activated marker that allows troops to communicate with written messages in low or no-light conditions, with or without night vision devices.

This marker, along with a second patent by Brott and his team involving infrared phosphor technology, has recently been licensed to Battle Sight Technologies, which expands to their existing collection of infrared technologies. This technology works similarly to the dials on a watch, absorbing ultraviolet light during the day and emitting an infrared light at night.

This suite of infrared products, such as glow sticks or patches and packs displaying glow-in-the-dark reflective strips, are all used for battlefield communication and training. Additionally, these products are used to identify U.S. military locations to friendly ground forces and aircraft.

Identification is a must when troops are partnering with foreign forces, including uniformed soldiers using civilian trucks.

In March, the Air Force awarded Battle Sight Technologies $165,000 to continue developing products based off the core patches, tapes and molded parts to support low-light/no-light communication.

“Through express tech licensing, it is easy to discover which technologies are available and also learn about pre-negotiated terms and pricing,” said Sunita Chavan, Materials and Manufacturing Technology Transfer Office lead. “There is total transparency. If a company is interested in entering into a licensing agreement, they can complete an easy application.”

“One-stop shopping” is a term Chavan uses to explain express tech licensing. The user-friendly process makes Air Force technologies available to companies of all sizes while eliminating lengthy contract negotiations associated with government patent licensing.

Predetermined upfront fees and royalty fees make the express licensing platform an easy option, according to Chavan.


The next steps include learning how to scale-up the production process. “We are used to making small, lab-scale batches where we can produce 15 crayons per day,” Brott said. “We are getting such interest in this product that we are now being asked to make 200 crayons daily.”

Various “flavors” of crayons are also being requested to match different scenarios. Infrared crayons that leave no trace, and crayons that glow visibly at night while leaving a bright pink pigment mark for daytime viewing are some examples.

These variations are for first responders who might answer to a night-time train wreck. After searching a train car, they would mark it so that it would be visible at night, and also apparent once the sun rises.

“We are working hard to meet a deadline, for a ‘first responder’ convention in October and anticipating a much larger demand for the crayons after the word gets out,” Brott said.

Engage

Facebook Twitter
Thank you #Detroit for hosting us. Citizens of #Chicago, #AmericasAirForce is heading your way this October. Stay t… https://t.co/0rxv3RyqHK
RT @USSOCOM: #ICYMI "As the sole special operations ground force component operating within the exercise, the Special Tactics troops provid…
RT @419fw: Nearly 70 here @HAFB flown and maintained by the active duty @388fw and @AirForceReserve @419fw, the first operational F-35A uni…
RT @AFGlobalStrike: In case of national emergency or destruction of ground command and control centers, the #E-4B provides a highly surviv…
Last year the #AirForce awarded Master Sgt. John Chapman the #MedalofHonor. Learn more about what Air Combat Contro… https://t.co/EUFWB28Atr
RT @USAFReserve: .@926thWing, 706th Fighter Squadron set to receive @AirForceAssoc awards in September - https://t.co/SYkxaMS0Q4 #ReserveRe
#Detroit did you miss us at 7:15 on WJR? Good thing you can tune into WFDF radio on the air or online at 910AM Supe… https://t.co/WMJ6JDK4Ie
Good Morning! Tune into WJR 760 AM now to hear from Lt. Gen. Gene Kirkland as he talks to #Detroit’s own Paul W. Sm… https://t.co/WZkt0qYeee
RT @realwarriors: Staff Sgt. Brittany Johnson spent years fighting memories of her sexual assault. By seeking care, she learned what trigge…
RT @AirMobilityCmd: In less than two weeks, more than 100 Total Force C-130 Hercules aircraft have been cleared to return to worldwide oper…
RT @DeptofDefense: Ready for take off. A @usairforce F-35A Lightning II taxis during an exercise at @HAFB, Utah. Maintainers were tasked t…
#DYK, the @Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich was inducted into the @AF_Academy's Athletic Hall of Fame Class of 2019.… https://t.co/xm7DUKmtO2
RT @USEmbassyPH: "Our relationship with the Philippine Air Force remains strong and will continue to grow." - Chief of Staff of the @usairf
RT @HQUSAFEPA: U.S. Air Forces Africa conducts multilateral mil-to-mil engagements and security assistance with Africa air forces in order…
RT @AF_SBIR_STTR: Over the span of two days, more than 150 Airmen representing 50 bases and 200 entrepreneurs representing 100 #SBIR Phase…
RT @JointBasePHH: The Sentry Aloha 19-2 exercise is taking place here at JBPHH. If you've noticed some unfamiliar aircraft in the sky, it's…
RT @AETCommand: 🙌👏 Congrats to Tech. Sgt. Stephen Conklin, @APDInfo police officer & former military working dog handler, who rocked the te…
.@detroitpolice Hello #Detroit!!! #americasairforce is in town. Check out photos from the 11th Precinct Youth Olym… https://t.co/ijzV6uVSQs