HomeNewsArticle Display

Final phase of C-17 drag reduction testing underway

Six microvanes are bonded to each side of the aft fuselage of the test C-17 for phases three, four and five in the C-17 Drag Reduction Program managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory, Advanced Power Technology Office, and tested by the 418th Flight Test Squadron at Edwards AFB. The C-17 Globemaster III used for all five test phases is provided by Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kenji Thuloweit)

Six microvanes are bonded to each side of the aft fuselage of a test C-17 Globemaster III for phases three, four and five in the C-17 Drag Reduction Program managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory and tested by the 418th Flight Test Squadron at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. The C-17 Globemaster III used for all five test phases is provided by Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. (U.S. Air Force photo/Kenji Thuloweit)

Three fairings are placed near the leading edge of the wing at the engine pylons of a C-17 for phase four of C-17 Drag Reduction testing. The fairings are placed in areas where indications of airflow disturbance were identified during computer simulations. Phase four tested the fairings along with six microvanes on each side of the aft fuselage of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kenji Thuloweit)

Three fairings are placed near the leading edge of the wing at the engine pylons of a C-17 Globemaster III for phase four of C-17 Drag Reduction testing at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. The fairings are placed in areas where indications of airflow disturbance were identified during computer simulations. Phase four tested the fairings along with six microvanes on each side of the aft fuselage of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo/Kenji Thuloweit)

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (AFNS) -- When it comes to aviation fuel, the C-17 Globemaster III utilization rate makes it stand out as the largest consumer in the Air Force. This is why a team at the 418th Flight Test Squadron has been working for the past year on the Air Force Research Laboratory’s C-17 Drag Reduction Program.

The 418th FLTS is currently wrapping up testing with the final three phases – out of five total – using 3-D printed parts by Lockheed Martin. The Lockheed Martin installations use a combination of laser positioning for locating and sealant to bond the parts to the aircraft. The laser positioning allowed the team to skip the design and build of installation tooling that would only be used during flight testing according to test managers. The bonding simplifies the installation and more importantly leaves the aircraft in its pretest condition after removal at the end of the flight test program.

The squadron is testing parts in various configurations to see if the external structure modifications can improve airflow around the airplane. During computational fluid dynamics simulations and wind tunnel tests, areas on the C-17 were identified that showed excessive drag and were targeted for optimization.

In the spring, the first two phases of testing were completed. Those tests were conducted with two different configurations of parts made by Vortex Control Technologies.

The placement of the parts and the different configurations hope to reduce drag and improve fuel efficiency.

“A 1 percent improvement in drag reduction will result in 7.1 million gallons of fuel reduction per year,” said Bogdan Wozniak, the 418th FLTS, project engineer. “One to 2 percent drag reduction could translate to $24-48 million dollars in fuel savings per year.”

Currently, the team is preparing to test the fifth and final configuration using the Lockheed Martin parts. They have recently tested the third and fourth phases, which consisted of placing 12 microvanes toward the aft of the C-17 for phase three and then adding three fairings to each wing for phase four.

The fifth phase will keep the 12 microvanes and six total fairings with the addition of two fairings on each winglet.

At least three flight tests are conducted with each phase – a flying qualities regression flight and cruise performance flights at .74 and .77 Mach. The team will also conduct airdrop tests in December to ensure the microvanes do not interfere with the C-17’s airdrop mission.

The flights are always the same to make certain the data collected in each phase can be accurately compared to each other. The 418th FLTS is also using the same C-17 for all the flights. The plane is on loan from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, along with four maintenance Airmen.

“Aircraft and atmospheric data are collected with the aircraft flying straight and level at a constant airspeed and constant altitude with low winds and low air turbulence at 90 degrees to the wind to mitigate head- and tailwind effects. Each flight at a constant airspeed and altitude requires eight hours to acquire sufficient data for the analysis,” Wozniak said.

Flight data is collected and put into a computer program developed by Boeing that puts out parameters for lift and drag and then compares everything to see how much drag is reduced.

The flight tests here are the final stage of AFRL's program following computational fluid dynamics simulations and wind tunnel tests with a scale model. The data collected will be sent to AFRL at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, to see if any of the modifications increase streamlining and reduce drag. Then, Air Force leaders will ultimately decide whether or not any of the modifications should be implemented throughout the C-17 fleet.

The test team at Edwards AFB consists of 412th Test Wing personnel, Lockheed Martin and Boeing contractors along with representatives from Canada, the U.K. and Australia, who have a stake in the program.

The final flight for the C-17 Drag Reduction Program is expected to happen in December.

Engage

Facebook Twitter
RT @OHNationalGuard: The @180thFW hosted members of the Nigerian Air Force recently Officers visited the 180FW in search of #bestpractice
RT @HiAirGuard: Airmen from 154th Security Forces Squadron became first responders during a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear…
RT @US_SOCEUR: U.S. #airmen assigned to the 352d Special Operations Wing perform maintenance on a CV-22B #Osprey aircraft in Szolnok, #Hung
RT @HQ_AFMC: The @AFResearchLab s X-60A program achieved a key developmental #milestone with the completion of integrated vehicle propulsio…
RT @DeptofDefense: If you want to get there as fast as possible, don’t stop for gas. ⛽ That’s why the @usairforce relies on airmen like Tec…
RT @DeptofDefense: Press ▶️ to learn more about @USAFCENT, the command that provides air & space warfighting capabilities to help defeat v…
Airmen with the Puerto Rico Air National Guard provide support at the “tent cities” to support Task Force South and… https://t.co/zg2yT0LqpS
Even the most advanced aircraft in history requires extensive maintenance performed by Airmen on the ground to kee… https://t.co/Kpv8JlzYIc
RT @AirMobilityCmd: Throwback Thursday and #TankerThirstThursday are the same game. Throwing it back to last month when a KC-135 Stratotank…
If you thought the C-5M Super Galaxy was cool before, wait until you hear @RichardHammond describe it and its capab… https://t.co/jbYbdyHx5q
Air National Guardsmen from @105AW are on the ground in Puerto Rico with their counterpart, @PRNationalGuard, provi… https://t.co/ZwzhCEpWY4
RT @HAFB: Join us for the Hill Air Force Base 80th Anniversary Celebration from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Jan. 18 at the Hill Aerospace Museum! A nu…
Ranges are crucial to the training and readiness of our warfighters. Get an inside look at how they prepare to figh… https://t.co/i5CnbpBGAw
.@cmsaf18 and his wingman, Senior Enlisted Advisor to Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Chief Master Sergeant… https://t.co/UD69jCjHPz
#AirForce is always looking for ways to improve processes and patient health care is no different. @JBSA_Official h… https://t.co/ysEFjoXYCE
RT @USAF_ACC: You know what day it is. #WarthogWednesday! 🐗👏 #DYK the weapon on the #A10Thunderbolt II is a 30 millimeter GAU-8 and is des…
RT @SpaceForceDoD: Earlier today, @SpaceForceCSO Gen. John W. Raymond became the first ever Chief of Space Operations. @VP Vice President M…
C-17 Globemaster IIIs sit at @March_ARB, where their engines routinely receive special eco-washes to prevent corros… https://t.co/so1CEcJYsP
.@90thMissileWing's innovative #Airmen have developed a virtual care system. Learn how Airmen in the field can use… https://t.co/1EqZgBm0FR